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Locating the Disconnected: Zines in Academic Libraries

Co-presenter: 

Jennifer Gilley

Kayo Denda

Sharon Ladenson

Event: 

National Women's Studies Association conference

Abstract: 

As the explosion of feminist knowledge production of the last 40 years encounters the expansive potential of the digital age, the outlook for ease of access to women’s studies research materials seems bright indeed, but the picture is not an uncomplicated one. This panel will explore the most pressing issues facing the future of women’s studies information-seeking. Issues specifically considered are 1) the creation of an ontology, or common vocabulary for researchers, that could make searching for feminist materials uniform and effective over many databases, and 2) the importance of collecting and providing access to zines and other alternative materials.

Presentation: 

Fact Up: Fact Checking and FOIA

Co-presenter: 

Dena Marger

Event: 

National Conference on Organized Resistance 2006

Abstract: 

This workshop gives marginalized media some of the same tools available to their mainstream counterparts. Whether they use them effectively or not, corporate journalists have access to fact checkers and news libraries. FOIA, the Freedom of Information Act is a powerful tool that forces federal agencies to disclose requested records. Radical Reference librarians will teach attendees how to do access and report important information themselves. Radical Reference is a collective of volunteer library workers who believe in social justice and equality.

Presentation: 

Radical Reference and Zines: Activist Librarianship at Your library, Online, and in the Street

Event: 

LACUNY

Abstract: 

This presentation focuses on expanding library services for activists and independent media makers, especially youth. Specifically the volunteer organization Radical Reference and the zine collection at Barnard College will be discussed.

Radical Reference is a collective of volunteer librarians who support activist communities, progressive organizations, and independent journalists by providing professional research support, education, and access to information. Zines are self-publications with roots in American revolutionary war pamphlets and science fiction fanzines. How do these new initiatives support the mission of urban librarianship in a public higher education setting?

Presentation: 

Open Source Software and Community Activism: The Radical Reference Model

Co-presenter: 

Eric Goldhagen

Event: 

National Conference on Organized Resistance 2007

Abstract: 

What do people mean when they say "free software"? What do we lose as a movement when we make decisions to use tools that are developed by profit-centric corporations? What community-centric alternatives exist?

In answering the above questions, we will give an accessible history of Free/Open Source software, including touching on licensing and copyright issues and then applying them to an activist community project, Radical Reference. This is a discussion for activists that use the internet as well as those that consider themselves to be techies.

Radical Reference: Community Librarianship and Free/Open Source Technology

Co-presenter: 

Eric Goldhagen

Event: 

Massachusetts Library Association Conference, 2007

Abstract: 

Radical Reference has been providing library services to political activists and independent journalists since July 2004. They help people online, in the street, in the classroom and on the exhibit floor. Their technology based services are delivered using Free/Open Source tools and yours can be, too. Learn about Radical Reference and how you can use their model to deliver services in your own communities.

Presentation: 

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