Tagged with talks

Pratt Insitute Library Media Specialists class

Co-presenter: 

Jessica Hochman

Melissa Jones

Event: 

Pratt Insitute Library Media Specialists class

Abstract: 

Barnard Library Zine Collection
Pratt Institute LMS Class

November 19, 2008

with Teacher/Librarian Melissa Jones
Professor Jessica Hochman

Presentation: 

Hands-on Library Research Instruction

Co-presenter: 

Kanu Nagra, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Maura Smale, New York City College of Technology

Event: 

METRO BI SIG Proven Instructional Strategies series

Abstract: 

Hands-On Instruction in Advanced Search Techniques in Library Catalogs and Databases for METRO Bibliographic Instruction Special Interest Group Proven Instructional Strategies series.

2pm-4pm, Tuesday, November 18, 2008
Room 6418 at the CUNY Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue, between 34th and 35th Streets.

Presentation: 

Feminist and People of Color Zines

Co-presenter: 

Ileana Jiménez

Event: 

Elisabeth Irwin HS class visit to Barnard Library Zine Collection

Abstract: 

Fierce and Fabulous: Feminist Women Writers, Artists, and Activists class taught by Ileana Jiménez at the Little Red School House/Elisabeth Irwin High School

Ileana's bio:
Ileana Jimenez has been teaching English in independent schools for twelve years. For the first seven years of her career, Ileana brought a feminist vision to single sex girls’ schools in Baltimore and Washington, DC. Working with girls and encouraging them to write personal stories about race, class, gender, ethnicity, religion, sexuality, and body image became the focus of both her classroom and scholarly work. She now teaches at the Little Red School House & Elisabeth Irwin High School (www.lrei.org), where she offers courses on feminist women writers, artists, and activists; race, class, and gender in American culture; LGBT literature and film; Latino/a literature; memoir writing; and a seminar on Toni Morrison. Ileana also coordinates a professional affinity group for LGBT independent school educators in New York, and continues to be involved in national conversations about education and social justice. She frequently leads presentations on integrating Latina/o and LGBT authors in the classroom as well as creating inclusive programming for LGBT students of color and their allies at the annual NAIS People of Color Conference and the NYSAIS diversity conference. She is also a frequent panelist and speaker at Smith, particularly for the college’s diversity, alumnae admissions, and alumnae affinity group initiatives. She is currently the board vice chair and secretary of the Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice (www.astraea.org) and is a judge for the Lambda Literary Awards, one of the nation’s premier LGBT awards. Ileana received her MA in English Literature at Middlebury College’s Bread Loaf School of English and her BA in English Literature at Smith College.

Presentation: 

Self-Publication with Punk Rock Ideals: Zines ≠ Vanity Press Publications

Co-presenter: 
Event: 

18th Annual Women's Studies Conference at Southern Connecticut State University

Abstract: 

18th Annual Women's Studies Conference at Southern Connecticut State University

Zines are self-published, but the motivation behind their publication is different than that driving many vanity press and chapbook authors. The principles of punk rock and riot grrrl community are fundamental to zines, not just as the cultures that birthed them in their current incarnation, but also as what separates them from other self-publications. By collecting and preserving zines, the non-music primary sources of punk rock, librarians are documenting these movements in the participants’ own voices—the voices of those too young, too politically radical, too crusty, and/or too bad mannered to appeal to the corporate media. It is important to note that zine producers are not only people who have been relegated to the margins but also people who have chosen to claim the margins. In contrast to most writers, many zine producers might choose to reject an offer from corporate publishing house. Why let someone else control what you can say, when you can do it yourself? This presentation will address the politics and cultural motivations of zine publication and contrast them with other types of self-publication. Focusing specifically on materials from Barnard College’s open-stack zine collection that uses riot grrrl and other third wave feminist zines to enhance its research-oriented Women’s Studies book collection, this paper will go on to explore why zines belong in established library collections.

Handout: 
Presentation: 

(un)intentional community: queer zines in an institutional context

Co-presenter: 

Kelly Shortandqueer

Chris Wilde

Laura Wynholds

Event: 

GLBT ALMS

Abstract: 

Zines are important in archives for a number of reasons. First of all, they represent an important primary source of information for future historians. They usually come from subcultures that are poorly documented in the larger culture. Furthermore, unlike the traditional print media, they represent an unmediated rendition of people's experiences in a particular place and time distributed to a significant (albeit small) audience. Secondly, in a time when writing communities are increasingly digital ( e.g. blogs, myspace, facebook), the print culture of the zine world is unique in its sociology. People make zines, trade them with others, write letters, and meet other like minded people. The zine genre is almost as well known for its creation of community as it is for its contribution of physical documents.

Within the context of lgbt archives, the theme of building community is an important one. However, the traditional method of cataloging and housing zines (as monographs or serials) does little to preserve the context out of which the documents were created. Despite this, the culture of community still plays an important role and overlaps into archives preserving zines. This panel will present the views of queer zine collecting in academic as well as non-traditional archives and libraries. We will discuss the ways that the diy zine communities overlap into these collections, as well as the ways the larger parent institution shapes the type of community involvement.

Presentation: 

Radical Reference and Zines: Effecting Change at Your library, Online, and in the Street

Event: 

Pratt Institute library school talk, April 9, 2008.

Abstract: 

This is about activism in your library and in your life, focusing on Radical Reference and the Barnard Library Zine Collection and hoping that session participants will feel empowered to develop projects and collections in their libraries and lives. Romel Espinel invited me on behalf of SILSSA.

Handout: 
Presentation: 

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